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Jaycee Dugard Speaks About Abduction, Captivity:  Jessica Hopper of ABC News reports Jaycee Dugard is writing and speaking about her 18-year captivity in the backyard of a convicted sex offender.  Dugard says she was shocked with a stun gun on her way to school by a passerby and stuffed into the backseat of the Phillip and Nancy Garrido's car, then brought to a shed in the backyard of their Antioch home where she was raped and gave birth to two of her abuser's children.  Dugard calls Garrido's wife "just as evil as her husband."  Dugard now wears a charm of a pine cone around her neck as a symbol of hope, as a sticky pine cone was the last thing she touched on the side of the road before her abduction. 

Monitoring of Jaycee Dugard's Kidnapper "Substandard":  In a related story, federal supervision of convicted sex offender Phillip Garrido was "clearly substandard," according to a report by U.S. Chief District Judge James Ware in San Francisco.  Garrido was classified as a high-risk sex offender after he served a federal prison sentence for kidnapping a Nevada woman in 1976, but the report states federal probation officers "failed to supervise him accordingly" despite Garrido's questionable behavior, problematic psychological reports, and dirty urine samples.  The report says that California authorities did an equally poor job supervising Garrido after he was transferred to their authority in 1999, missing several opportunities to discover Jaycee and her children hidden in a backyard shed.  Don Thompson of the AP has this story

New Mexico Labs Post-BullcomingNew Mexico officials are brainstorming ways to conform to the Supreme Court's recent decision in Bullcoming v. New Mexico in cases involving drug- and alcohol-related tests, reports Elizabeth Piazza of The Daily Times (NM).  New Mexico has only one lab for such testing, making it expensive and time-consuming for lab technicians to travel to courts in other areas of the state.  Hiring more lab technicians might prove difficult for budget-strapped agencies, and so officials are considering alternative solutions such as notice-and-demand statutes and video conferencing.  Hit tip to How Appealing

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