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Lessons From An Exceptionally Gruesome Act of Workplace Violence

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Miguel Bustillo, Ana Campoy, and Andrew Grossman report in the WSJ:

At a news conference, Sgt. Jeremy Lewis of the Police Department in Moore, near Oklahoma City, said the suspect in the stabbing spree, Alton Nolen, began attacking workers at random after he was fired from his job at the city's Vaughan Foods Inc. processing plant around 4:05 p.m. local time on Thursday.

When police arrived, two women in the plant's front office area had been attacked and Mr. Nolen, 30, lay wounded from gunshots, Sgt. Lewis said. One of the women, Colleen Hufford, 54, was decapitated. "He did kill Colleen and did sever her head," Sgt. Lewis said.

Police determined that as Mr. Nolen attacked the second victim, Traci Johnson, 43, he was confronted and shot by the chief operating officer of Vaughan Foods, Mark Vaughan, who is a reserve Oklahoma County sheriff's deputy, Sgt. Lewis said. "This off-duty deputy definitely saved Traci's life," he said, describing Mr. Vaughan as a hero. "This was not going to stop if he didn't stop it."
I won't comment on whether this is terrorism, insanity, or something else until more facts are known.

What is known at this point is that, as horrible as this crime was, it could have been much worse if there had not been an armed citizen on the scene.  In addition, there is this:

Mr. Nolen has had several prior run-ins with the law, according to Oklahoma Department of Corrections records. He was convicted of marijuana possession, assaulting a police officer and escape from detention in January 2011, for which he received several years in jail.

In April of that same year, he was found guilty of possessing cocaine with intent to distribute. He was released from prison in 2013, the records show.
One of the more recent efforts of the soft-on-crime crowd is to try to stop employers from asking about criminal records in making hiring decisions.  The drive is called "ban the box," referring to a common check-box on application forms.  If this company had declined to hire this violent drug-dealer, it would not have one employee beheaded and another in the hospital with multiple stab wounds.

The "ban the box" crowd is trying to frame their effort as a civil rights cause.  The bedrock principle of civil rights -- that people should be judged on the content of their character and not the color of their skin -- is being perverted into the exact opposite -- that people should not be judged on the content of their character.

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