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3,000 Prisoners Mistakenly Freed Early:  Since 2002, 3,000 prisoners in Washington have been released early by mistake due to a software error by the state's Department of Corrections.  Rachel la Corte of the AP reports that a 2002 state Supreme Court ruling required the Department of Corrections to apply good-behavior credits earned in county jail to state prison sentences, but the programming fix gave prisoners with sentencing enhancements too much good-time credit, resulting in the release of 3,200 offenders.  The Department of Corrections was first alerted of the computer glitch in December 2012 and had announced that it would be fixed the same month, but it wasn't.  A broad fix to the software problem is expected to be in place by early January.  In the meantime, officials are working to track down the affected offenders, the complete list of whom are unknown.  So far, seven individuals have been identified as needing to serve additional time.  When asked if mistakenly released prisoners are committing new crimes, general counsel for Gov. Jay Inslee's office didn't have an answer.

Fewer Illegals Deported as Amnesty Kicks in:  As the president's amnesty begins taking effect, the number of deportations from the U.S. in 2015 dropped dramatically, highlighting the "willful neglect" of the Obama administration.  Stephen Dinan of the Washington Times reports that President Obama's amnesty order, which has shielded most illegal immigrants from even the fear of deportation, has led to a 32 percent drop in removals from the interior of the country and a 27 percent overall drop of deportations over the last year, which are only a little more than half of what they were in 2012 when the administration was setting records for removals.  This year, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) deported 63,127 illegal immigrants, down from 87,000 in 2014, believed to be affected by sanctuary cities refusing to cooperate with federal authorities, as well as Homeland Security's shifting of resources to the border instead of focusing on the immigrants in the interior.

Thousands of Shootings in Gun-Controlled Chicago:  In Chicago, a city with a ban on assault weapons, a violence tax on every gun and bullet sold, strict limitations on the quantity and location of gun stores and an array of other tight gun control regulations, there have been nearly 3,000 shootings victims this year.  Awr Hawkins of Breitbart reports that, year-to-date, there have been a total of 2,887 shooting victims in the city, exemplifying the failure of Chicago's gun control efforts, which have made it more difficult for law-abiding citizens to acquire guns needed for self-defense while simultaneously making them less safe.  This weekend alone, three people were shot dead and 26 more were wounded, a typical day in modern Chicago.

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Regarding the erroneous Washington prison release, to the extent the criminals didn't commit additional crimes and the erroneous release didn't shave a serious amount of time from a sentence, it seems that (unless the release was very recent) the state should simply let it go. Imagine having done your time, gotten out, living a law abiding life and then have to go back to prison years later. Seems wrong to me.

federalist: I live in Washington, and my (limited) understanding is that they will most likely be seeking only recently-released offenders for additional time (as well as correcting the sentences of inmates who are still serving their time, of course). They will not be looking for every offender who got a break going back to 2002, which would be impossible in any event.

Regardless of how they handle it, though, it makes me so angry that our state government can't handle a basic function like ensuring that felons serve their prison sentences, and it almost makes me embarrassed to be a government employee (although my office does a fantastic job with inadequate resources, IMO).

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