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Parolee Charged With Rape One Day After Release:  A Rochester man has been charged with multiple counts of rape for sexually assaulting a 14-year-old girl on a street, just one day after being released on parole.  The AP reports that Michael Carunthers was paroled after completing just over two year of a 2½ to five year sentence for robbery.  He faces up to 50 years in prison for the rape charges.

Felon Voting Bill Passes AL House:  A bill that would create a list of the felony offenses that would cost criminals their voting rights was approved Tuesday by the Alabama House of Representatives.  Tim Lockette of the Anniston Star reports that the changes to the state's 1901 Constitution would classify murder, rape, drug and terrorism charges, theft and bigamy as felonies that would revoke one's voting rights.  The bill was one of seven election-related bills sponsored by Republicans in the state.

Jail Overcrowding Bill Heads To Committee:  California State Senator Ted Gaines is sponsoring a bill authorizing county sheriffs to contract with any state, county, private jail or prison system in the United States to transfer inmates from counties whose jail or prison population is over 80 percent capacity.  Davis Brenda of the Record Searchlight reports that SB 171 is scheduled to go before the Senate Public Safety Committee on May 12.  Sen. Gaines is unsure of what the specific costs for a transfer would be, but believes the money will come out of the state's general fund.

Early Releases Up 37% After Realignment, Audit Says:  The California state auditor has reported data showing that the number of inmates being released by county jails has increased by 37 percent since the passage of Realignment, or AB 109, three years ago.  The AP reports that in June 2014, 14,000 prisoners were released in one month compared to 10,200 in September 2011.  The audit also shows that while Realignment ultimately helped to lower the state's prison population, the population in county jails increased by 16 percent, which prompted thousands of early releases.

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Sex Offender Placement in Washington:  A county in Washington state hopes that the governor will approve their proposal that would avoid concentrating the state's most violent sex offenders in one area.  Jordan Schrader of the News Tribune reports that the proposal responds to the placement of nine released detainees in Pierce County, although none of them come from or committed crimes there.  The proposal requires sex offenders be placed in the county where the crime was committed, unless proximity to their victim or lack of treatment services prevents it.

Supreme Court Reconsiders Career Criminal Law:  In Johnson v. United States, the Supreme Court is reconsidering the scope of the 1980s Armed Career Criminal Act which adds a 15-year prison term on armed career criminals.  A defendant argues that the law is unconstitutionally vague on what crimes warrant the additional penalty.  David G. Savage of the LA Times reports that the law cites burglary, arson, extortion, and the use of explosives as violent crimes, but Justices are divided about the law's phrasing of "conduct that presents a serious potential risk of physical injury to another."  

Gun Offender Registry Adopted in Cleveland:  Cleveland City Council passed legislation on Monday that would require gun offenders to register with the city's safety department within five days of moving into Cleveland or being released from prison.  Leila Atassi of the Northwest Ohio Media Group reports that other provisions in the legislation have replaced the city's current gun ordinances with language that better reflects state law, allowing police to charge offenders under the city code rather than state statute.  

More Preschool, Less Crime:  Illinois' top law enforcement officials believe preschool helps deter children from crime and have organized a group called Fight Crime: Invest in Kids Illinois to help support state funding for early childhood education.  Alicia Fabbre of the Chicago Tribune reports that a study revealed that students who didn't attend preschool were "five times more likely to be arrested for drug felonies and two times more likely to be arrested for violent crimes by the age of 27" than those who attended preschool.  The group is asking lawmakers to boost preschool funding by $50 million.

Gang Member Granted Amnesty Under DACA:  The Obama administration has admitted to granting executive amnesty to a known gang member charged with four counts of murder and now promises to work to assure that other gang members weren't approved for deferred status.  Caroline May of Beitbart reports that Emmanuel Jesus Rangel-Hernandez's approval for deferred status under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program violated standard procedure and should not have been approved.  The Obama administration has approved over 866,638 DACA applications since March 20, and many fear that the US Citizenship and Immigration Services is not eliminating dangerous applicants from the DACA program.

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Sex Predator Gets Second Chance, Reoffends:  Michael Shepard, released after serving a 15-year-sentence for committing sex offenses against children, faces 14 new charges of raping or assaulting at least 7 children after being out of prison 18 months.  Claire McNeill of the Tampa Bay Times reports that Shepard initially lied to his neighbors about his crimes, claiming his sex offender status stemmed from a Romeo and Juliet affair with a preacher's daughter.  He was released from prison after two psychologists determined that he "did not qualify for commitment" to a treatment facility after his sentence.  Shepard claims that the children fabricated their stories.

Milwaukee's Spiraling Violence:  Milwaukee, Wisconsin, has suffered dozens of violent incidents this year, claiming the lives of at least 43 people.  Gina Barton and Ashley Luthern of the Journal Sentinel report that the mayor and police chief have cited the city's concealed carry law, but others blame the increase on police department cuts and a policy barring police from high speed chases unless there is probable cause that someone in the suspect vehicle is a dangerous felon.  The mayor plans to spend $2 million to improve the investigation and charging of gun crimes.

Death Penalty Rare for Child Killers:  Ohio prosecutor Joe Deters' effort to enact legislation permitting prosecutors to seek the death penalty in cases involving the killing of a child has paid off.  Paula Christian of WCPO reports that Deters was outraged when prosecuting child-killer Richard Joseph Klein 18 years ago.  Klein received a sentence of only 31 years for holding down his girlfriend's mentally disabled 12-year-old son in scalding hot water until he died.  Now that the new law has passed, Deters plans to seek the death penalty against a couple accused of torturing their 2-year-old daughter to death.

Texas Aids Arkansas With Prison Overcrowding:  A contract with Bowie County, Texas, allows Arkansas to place up to 288 of its male inmates in a Texas facility.  John Lyon of the Arkansas News Bureau reports that the contract expires on December 31.  "More innovative approaches" yielding long-term impact are being considered.  State prison officials hoped to begin construction of a new 1,000-bed prison last year, but Governor Asa Hutchinson has a different plan to add bed space without building a new prison.  Another alternative, as outlined in Act 1206 of 2015, would allow counties to house state prisoners in regional correctional facilities subject to the governor's approval.

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Only Minor Changes In Vermont's Sex Offender Laws:  A high-risk sex offender was released from a Vermont after maxing out his sentence, despite his refusal to seek treatment while incarcerated, sparking public demand for stricter sex offender laws.  Alex Keefe and Lynne McCrea of VPR report that lawmakers are considering two weak reforms.  The first would be a clarification to an existing that that states sex offenders must report their plans and activities to the registry before their release from jail.  The second would improve the sex offender registry's accuracy.  Also, several additional requirements have been considered for sex offenders labeled as high-risk.

New System Screens Out Registered Sex Offenders:  A high-tech system that produces instant background checks is being used at schools in Southern Indiana to protect students from sex offenders and other threats.  Stephan Johnson of WDRB reports that the Raptor System performs an immediate background check at the school's entrance, and then prints out a label with the person's name and photo ID if the system approves their entry.  The police department in Clarksville, Indiana purchased the system for the local elementary school.

Uniform Trafficking Law Heads To ND Governor:  North Dakota lawmakers are proposing a uniform law on human trafficking in an effort to move towards helping the victims.  Katherine Lymn of the Dickinson Press reports that Senate Bill 2107 would grant immunity to minors who committed prostitution offenses and other nonviolent crimes related to being trafficked, a law also known as Safe Harbor.  Adult victims would have their prostitution convictions and other related offenses expunged if the court determines the crime resulted from trafficking.  The bill is now headed to the governor for final approval.

Arkansas Parole Officers Overloaded:  In the state of Arkansas, 402 parole officers are responsible for the supervision of 52,292 parolees, equating to an average of 130 parolees per officer, or twice the national caseload average.  Josh Dooley of the Baxter Bulletin reports that with such large caseloads, officers say it is impossible to provide adequate supervision and they "just have to hope nothing bad happens."  Arkansas governor has approved funds to hire 45 additional parole officers over the next two years and add 500 beds in reentry programs across the state.

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Crime Rise Puts LAPD In Difficult Position:  Los Angeles Chief of Police wants to send more than 200 officers from the highly trained, "elite" Metro Division to combat the city's first major crime increase in over ten years.  Kate Mather, Richard Winton and Cindy Chang of the LA Times report that the new data-driven, predictive policing strategy will transition from utilizing beat cops focused on building community relations to Metro officers employing their specialized tactical and weapons training.  Law enforcement officials have admitted that although the change is not ideal, something must be done to reverse the 26% increase in violent crime and 11% increase in property crime.

NE Bill Removing Mandatory Minimums Clears Senate:  Nebraska's proposed sentencing reform measure, which would limit the use of mandatory minimum sentences to reduce prison overcrowding, passed the state senate yesterday with a 28-9 vote.  Grant Schulte of the AP reports that the bill would eliminate mandatory minimum sentences for certain felonies such a robbery and assault on a police officer, and would limit use of the "habitual criminal" enhancement.  Nebraska's Attorney General and some conservative senators criticize the bill for removing tools essential for prosecutors to do their jobs.  Supporters claim the law would not affect a judge's ability to impose long sentences for heinous crimes.

Tulane Body Camera Footage Will Not Be Public Record:  The footage obtained from body cameras of the Tulane University Police Department in Louisiana will not be made available to the public, according to the Office of General Counsel.  Brandi Doyal of the Hullabaloo reports that it is not a requirement for TUPD to release footage because "it is not a public body under the provisions of the Louisiana Public Records Act."  General Counsel states that the decision protects the rights of victims and perpetrators, but opponents of the policy feel that the public has the right to view the tapes.

Half The States Consider Right-To-Die Legislation:  Half of US states are considering medically assisted suicide legislation this year, which would "allow mentally fit, terminally ill patients age 18 and over, whose doctors say they have six months to live, to request lethal drugs."  Malak Monir of USA Today reports that Oregon, in 1997, was the first state to have "right-to-die" legislation written into law, and its practice has led to benefits in improving the quality of life for terminally ill patients in the state.  Opponents argue that the potential for mistakes and abuse offset any benefits.

Parolee Speeding To Make Curfew Kills Passenger:  A felon on parole was hurrying home on his motorcycle to comply with his curfew requirements when he crashed on Highway 99, killing his female passenger.  Bill Lindelof of the Sacramento Bee reports that witnesses told CHP officers that the driver was traveling at a high rate of speed and weaving through traffic.  He  was later found to be under the influence of alcohol and arrested for gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, driving without a license, and violating parole.  The victim was 21-year-old.

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Feds Releasing Hundreds Of Violent Illegal Immigrants:  Arrests and deportations of criminal aliens dropped 30% in the first six months of fiscal year 2015, despite President Obama's professed intention for agents to "focus on felons not families."  Stephen Diana of the Washington Times reports that 30,558 criminal aliens were "knowingly released back into the community" by ICE in 2014.  Together these aliens accumulated almost 80,000 convictions including violent crimes.  ICE Director Sarah Saldana defends the actions of the agency, stating that the laws passed under Congress require her to grant due process to everyone and make judgments about whom to keep detained.

Alien Children Allowed To Sue For Legal Representation:  A US District Court Judge in Washington state rejected a motion to dismiss a lawsuit that would grant legal representation to undocumented children facing deportation, ruling that their request for counsel "constituted an argument for due process."  Thomas Barrabi of the International Business Times reports that the ACLU filed the suit on behalf of Salvadorian sibling who immigrated illegally in 2013 to escape gang violence.  The ACLU has protested that mandatory detention of immigrants awaiting legal proceedings "violates the right to due process."

Tenn. Court Calls Off Scheduled Executions:  Four executions scheduled over the next year have been called off by the Tennessee Supreme Court to allow a trial court to review condemned murderer's challenges to the state's lethal injection protocol.  Mark Berman of the Washington Post reports that Tennessee is the latest state to halt executions while the courts consider challenges from Ohio, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, and Oklahoma.  The state plans to use the electric chair as its execution method of lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or if the necessary drugs are no longer available.

Six Jacksonville Shootings In Three Days:  Jacksonville, Florida is reeling in the aftermath of six shootings in three days, leaving residents and law enforcement questioning whether the violence is gang-related.  Larry Spruill of Action News JAX reports that residents believe gang activity is the only explanation for the violence, because gangs have a large presence in the city.  Gang counselor Ivan Brown is certain that at least one of the shootings, the drive-by, was carried out by gang members.

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Texas House Passes Border Prosecution Bill:  The Texas House of Representatives passed HB 12, a bill that formalizes the organizational structure of the Border Prosecution Unit.  Your Valley Voice reports that the BPU will operate as an independent unit, supporting attorneys that prosecute felony border crimes.  The unit will also act as a "clearinghouse" for information regarding the investigation and prosecution of border crimes, help to develop the best practices, and training programs for attorneys and law enforcement.

Law Would Stop Violent Felons From Owning Dogs:  A bill proposed by Wisconsin legislators would prevent felons convicted of "crimes against life and bodily security" from owning dogs.  Brenda McIntire of the Badger Herald reports that according to the senior humane animal control officer for the Green Bay Police Department, dogs can be trained to be dangerous, and can even be more threatening than a weapon because they act independently.  The bill is not breed-specific and outlines the behavior a dog would need to exhibit to be considered dangerous.

Bill To Limit Internet Access For Sex Offenders:  Texas lawmakers have introduced HB 372, a new bill that would require certain paroled sex offenders to have their internet access limited and monitored by the state.  Ashly Custer of Valley Central reports that there has been an increase in predators utilizing social media to prey on underage victims, according to the city of McAllen's police chief.  The bill will receive its third reading today.

Ohio's Death Penalty Law Faces Revision:  Two bipartisan Ohio senators are introducing a series of proposals to revise the state's capital punishment law, to improve fairness to defendants and strengthen public confidence.  Ann Sanner of the AP reports that the bill would require judges to be specific in their findings.  Court clerks would have to retain original trial file copies from death penalty cases, and attorneys would not be given a page limit on post-conviction petitions.  Some prosecutors on the task force created to analyze Ohio's 1981 law issued a dissenting report, claiming that many of the recommendations were rooted in anti-death penalty arguments.  Additional legislation should be introduced before July.

No Place to Execute Nevada Murderers:  With over 80 men on death row and no place to execute them, Nevada lawmakers are being asked to fund a new execution chamber.  Sean Whaley of the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports that Department of Corrections Director Greg Cox is seeking approximately $829,000 to build a new execution chamber at Ely State Prison, but expects that architectural firms will avoid participating in the design.  The Public Works Board estimated that the project would take two years to complete.  

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Man Arrested in AZ Has Been Deported 20 Times:  An Arizona man arrested following a high-speed chase is an illegal immigrant from Mexico who has been deported 20 times.  The AP reports that Genaro Cisneros-Delgado led a sheriff's deputy on a 30-mile car chase at dangerously high speeds before crashing through a locked gate and fleeing on foot with three other passengers.  The other passengers were also illegal immigrants from Mexico being smuggled by Cisneros-Delgado.  All four men were apprehended by law enforcement.

Man Avoids Death Penalty in 1997, Returns to Prison for Murder:  Targeted for the death penalty two decades ago for a 1994 robbery-murder, George Jones was sentenced to 30 years in prison.  He was released on parole in 2012, and is now back behind bars for another murder.  Bill Wichert of NJ reports that Jones pleaded guilty to reckless manslaughter in the 2013 murder.  His attorneys contend that he is mentally incompetent.  His sentencing is scheduled for May 5.

Study Says Sex Offenders May Have Linked Genes:  A 37-yearlong study of 20,000 men convicted of sex crimes in Sweden has revealed that genetics may play a role in the propensity toward sexual offending.  Don Melvin of CNN reports that the results of the study conclude that the biological sons of sex offenders were five times more likely than the norm to commit sex offenses.  One of the experts conducting the research believes using this information will be helpful to social workers who are working with families combating these issues.

Georgia to Allow Hormones for Transgender Inmates:  Georgia has ended its refusal to allow new hormone therapy to transgender inmates and is willing to provide treatment that is "constitutionally appropriate."  Deborah Sontag of the NY Times reports that Ashley Diamond, a transgender woman incarcerated at a men's facility, brought a lawsuit against the state claiming that her hormone treatment was illegally cut off.  The Justice Department sided with her, stating that the denial of her treatment violated prison officials' "obligation to assess and treat gender dysmorphia" as it would any other disease or mental condition.  Diamond is also suing the state for their failure to protect her from sexual violence.

New York City May Give Non-Citizens the Right to Vote:  The majority of the New York City council are in support of a bill that would give more than one million non-citizens full rights to vote in local elections, possibly solidifying "far-left dominance of New York City's government."  John Fund of the National Review reports that supporters of the bill feel that the interests of citizens and legal residents are synonymous, while opponents contest that voting is a right that must be earned through citizenship.  Mayor Bill de Blasio issued municipal ID cards to 500,000 undocumented immigrants last year, so it is unlikely that he will veto the bill.

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Chief Pitches Crime-Free Housing Program:  A new program combining education, permitting and enforcing initiatives for landlords is being proposed by the chief of police in Newton, Iowa.  Jamee A. Pierson of the Newton Daily News reports that the mandatory training will be required for all landlords, who will learn about crime prevention, resident selection, self-defense, background checks, and how to handle illegal activities and develop partnerships with law enforcement.  The goal of the program is to create safer, crime-free communities for landlords and tenants.

FL Senate Considers Statewide Body Cam Legislation:  Florida lawmakers are introducing a two part bill that would create a consistence policy for the use of body cameras in law enforcement.  WJHG reports that currently, thirteen agencies in the state are already using body cams, but there are no statewide guidelines on "who, how, or when they can be worn."  Civil rights advocates are concerned about issues of privacy trumping the "public's right to know," but law enforcement fully supports the legislation.

Convicted Dallas Area Cop Killer Set to Die:  With a newly purchased supply of pentobarbital, the Texas Department of Criminal Justice says that they have enough of the drug to carry out the executions of convicted cop killer Kent Sprouse and three other death row inmates scheduled to be executed this month.  Michael Graczyk of the AP reports that Sprouse confessed "almost immediately" to having fatally shot a police officer and another man outside of a convenience store in 2002.  His execution is scheduled for this evening.  He will be the fifth inmate executed in the state this year.  Update:  Sprouse was pronounced dead at 6:23 PM CST. 

Bill Proposes Post-Convicted Preservation of DNA:  House Bill 1069, which would require DNA samples collected in any felony case involving violence or sex offenses to be preserved through the length of the offender's sentence, was approved by the Washington Senate and is heading back to the House.  The AP reports that Washington doesn't automatically preserve DNA samples for serious felonies, instead requiring defendants to file motions demanding that the sample be preserved.  The Senate determined that samples are to be preserved for 99 years or the length of the statute of limitation, whichever one is shorter.

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Playing Cards Help Solve Cold Cases:  After a successful test run, the Colorado Bureau of Investigation are distributing playing cards to inmates containing photos of victims and information on unsolved homicides in the hopes that they can help to resolve some of the state's 1,600 cold cases.  Crimesider Staff of CBS News reports that this strategy was employed successfully in Florida, where 14 cases were solved, and South Carolina, where 10 cases were solved.  Colorado has already ordered 5,000 decks and plans to order 10,000 more in the next year.

Bill Would Make Revenge Porn a Crime:  Louisiana state Rep. Julie Stokes has introduced new legislation that would criminalize the act of posting naked photos of someone online without their consent.  Jaclyn Kelley of WWL TV reports that offenders would be fined up to $10,000 and could be incarcerated for up to two years.  The law would only apply to victims age 17 or older who are easily identified in the photo, as well as "any situation where there was reasonable understanding that the photo was to remain private."

Online System Created to Help Crime Victims:  A new online system that allows victims of crime to file personal claims to seek compensation for expenses such as medical, relocation, and loss of funds will launch throughout New York state over the next month.  Denise Nickerson of the Journal News reports that the system makes filing claims a simpler, time-saving process for both victims and the Office of Victim Services staff members.  Under state and federal law, however, victims can only use the system as a "last resort" once they have exhausted all other insurance options.

CA Dems Unveil Far-Reaching Package of Immigration Bills:  Democratic legislative leaders in California have introduced 10 pieces of legislation that aim to benefit illegal immigrants and make it harder for authorities to deport them.  Jessica Calefati of the San Jose Mercury News reports that groups opposing the bills say that, if passed, they will make illegal immigration a "more comfortable thing" and encourage more people from Mexico and Central America to illegally immigrate.  Officials also point out the burden California taxpayers will face in order to fund all of the bill proposals.  Analyses on the exact cost of each bill to taxpayers are yet to be completed.

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Another Surge Of Illegals Cross US Border:  More than 3,000 unaccompanied illegal immigrant children from Central America crossed the Mexican border last month, the highest rate since last summer.  Stephen Dinan of the Washington Times reports that thus far in 2015, authorities have captured 15,647 unaccompanied children and 13,911 family units.  The Obama Administration's failure to eliminate "pull factors," such as the loophole in our immigration law that requires non-Mexican children to be released into the US while they await deportation, is cited as the reason for the continued surge.  Although the numbers are lower than last year, many Americans support closing this loophole and speeding up deportations.

Work Release Program May Address Overcrowding:  The Howard County Jail in Indiana is considering a work release program that might alleviate the overcrowded jails.  Pat Munsey of the Kokomo Perspective reports that Community Corrections director Ray Tetrault supports the idea, emphasizing the program's benefits such as a reduced recidivism and low maintenance costs.  The program would still count as incarceration, and inmates sentenced to work release would have strict rules to follow in order to remain in the program.

Victim's Father: Why Was Criminal Migrant Free?:  The father of a 21-year-old man murdered in January by a criminal alien is outraged over the loose US border and immigration policies that allowed his son's murderer to freely roam the streets for years with no supervision.  Laurie Roberts of AZ Central reports that Apolinar Altamirano was a free man when he fatally shot Grant Ronnebeck over a pack of cigarettes, despite being a convicted felon with two protective orders filed against him.  Ronnebeck's father is hoping that his son's death will be a wake up call to the Obama Administration to fix our immigration laws.

Faster Ballistics Testing Solving Crimes:  Denver authorities are employing a new strategy that puts ballistics evidence into the hands of investigators much more quickly, before leads and suspects disappear.  Sadie Gurman of the AP reports that in the two years that the Crime Gun Intelligence Center in Denver has been in operation, matched shell casings have helped lead to the arrests of 35 suspects in over 50 shootings.  Chicago, Milwaukee, and New Orleans have also begun following this model.  An ATF agent in New Orleans noted that the city's murder rate is the lowest in 30 years, attributing most of the credit to their specialized unit that targets shooters.

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Illinois Weighs Automatic Obamacare Enrollment For Ex-Cons:  New legislation in Illinois would start inmates' Medicaid enrollment or re-enrollment 30 days before their release through the state's ObamaCare office.  Benjamin Yount of Fox News reports that automatic enrollment is in the state's "best interest."  A total of 30,083 inmates were released last year alone.

Rise in Prison Violence in NY:  New York State's prisons have seen a sharp rise in violence over the last five years, increasing roughly 50 percent since 2010.  Brian Mann of NCPR reports that the president of the New York State Correctional Officers & Police Benevolent Association (NYSCOPB) believes that increased drug activity, a stronger gang presence, and more violent young offenders entering the system are the prominent factors causing the surge of unrest in prisons.  The NYSCOPB stresses a need for more correctional officers due to retirements and administrative struggles to hire replacements.

Life Without Parole Bill Sparks Debate:  A passionate debate has erupted over a new bill that would authorize judges to hand down decide life without parole sentences instead of juries.  The AP reports that supporters regard the measure as a way to "clean up" the 2013 repeal of Maryland's death penalty, while opponents believe that the such a law would face constitutional legal challenges while abandoning a "fundamental component of our justice system is that the jury is a fact-finding entity."  The debate on the bill is continuing today.

State Dept. To Use Tax Dollars To Import Immigrant Children:  A new program will fly immigrant children under the age of 21 from some Central American countries to the US to be reunited with their parents on the taxpayers' dime.  The program was created in response to the surge of Central American children who have been illegally crossing the border in droves since last summer.  Kellan Howell of the Washington Times reports that any individual, whether a parolee or an illegal alien, that is receiving a work permit under Obama's executive amnesty would be eligible to have their children imported.  If approved, the children would be given special refugee status and begin earning taxpayer benefits once they are flown to the US.  One Democrat strategist told reporters that the program would be good for taxpayers. 

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Chicago Robbers Copy Cartel Roadblock Tactics:  Robbers on Chicago's south side are emulating Mexican cartel tactics by setting up fake roadblocks as a ruse to trap motorist and violently rob them.  Ildefonso Ortiz of Breitbart reports that this tactic is prevalent with both known Mexican drug cartels such as the Gulf Cartel and Los Zetas, and is so common in some Mexican border states that Federal police officers escort tourists to avoid danger.  Since the Mexican cartels control much of the illegal drug trade in Chicago, some speculate whether the robbers intentionally copied them or came up with the scheme on their own.

Iowa Bill to Shield Crime Victims' Addresses:  The Safe at Home Act, advancing through the Iowa legislature, would keep the home addresses of victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, trafficking and stalking confidential.  Mark Carlson of KCRG-TV9 reports that victims would receive a new legal address to be included on public records, but their actual address would not be available to the public.  Law enforcement and select officials would still have access to victims' true residences.

Bill Would Put Time Limit on Rape Kit Processing:  A bill passed yesterday by the Tennessee Senate Judiciary Committee, SB 0981, would require rape test kits to be sent to the state's testing lab within 60 days of the victim's written consent.  Kelli Cook of Local Memphis reports that law enforcement in the state are currently not require to submit a rape kit at all, resulting in thousands of untested kits, some of which are decades old.  The bill as it stands, however, is not the ultimate solution, as some officials maintain that there is a need for more funding for labs, prosecutors, and law enforcement.

NC Legislation Would Raise the Age of Juvenile Offenders:  A bipartisan group of lawmakers in North Carolina have introduced HB 399, or the Young Offenders Rehabilitation Act, which would raise the age of juvenile jurisdiction of 16- and 17-year-olds who have committed low-level misdemeanors to ensure that they do not end up in the adult criminal justice system.  Sandy Selvy-Mullis of the Stanly News & Press reports that according to a child advocacy group, 16- and 17-year-olds handled in the adult criminal justice system are twice as likely to recidivate as offenders in the juvenile criminal justice system.  North Carolina is only one of two states, along with New York, that automatically prosecutes all 16- and 17-year-old misdemeanants as adults, regardless of the seriousness of the crime.  New York is expected to revise their version of the law this spring.

DNA Collection at Arrest in Effect Today in Wisconsin:  A new law in Wisconsin requires all people arrested for violent felonies and anyone convicted of a felony or misdemeanor to submit a DNA sample.  This is expected to generate an additional 25,000 DNA samples from violent felony arrests and convictions and 43,000 samples from misdemeanor convictions.  Dee J. Hall of the Wisconsin State Journal reports that the state has expanded its Crime Laboratory and hired more analysts and forensic technicians to handle the increase.  Wisconsin is the 29th state to implement a DNA sample requirement at arrest.

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Spring Break Shooting Prompts Debate About Restrictions:  A spring break house party on the Florida Panhandle that erupted with gunfire and left seven people injured has prompted officials to consider cracking down on the out of control spring break season.  "This is what we've been trying to warn people about," said Bay County Sheriff Frank McKeithen. Until the shooting, the Sheriff's warnings had been ignored by most local officials.  Melissa Nelson-Gabriel and Matt Sedensky of the AP report that Panama City Beach's city council has allocated up to $200,000 to contribute to increased police patrols, discussed the implementation of an alcohol ban on beaches, as well as making the last-call on alcohol sales earlier.  The shooter, David Jamichael Daniels, was arrested and charged with seven counts of attempted murder.

Bill to Grant New Orleans DA Investigators Arrest Powers:  The city of New Orleans continues to surge with violent crime, leading a local state lawmaker to propose new legislation that would grant the Orleans Parish District Attorney's office more law enforcement authority, allowing the NOPD to focus on fighting crime.  Sabrina Wilson of Fox 8 WVUE reports that HB 179, created by Rep. Austin Badon, would give DA investigators arrest powers, which is the only element of authority that they currently don't share with police officers.  The district attorney supports the idea.

Bill Criminalizes Disclosure of Police and Military Personnel's Residences:  Pennsylvania state senator Lisa Boscola has proposed legislation that would make it a crime to disclose the home addresses of police officers and military personnel.  Jim Deegan of Lehigh Valley Live reports that disclosure would be classified as a third-degree misdemeanor and would apply to social media.  Given the dangerous and sensitive nature of both law enforcement and military duties, Boscola believes, once the bill is passed, it will protect them and their familes from harassment and potential violence.

COPPS Unit Successfully Targets Property Crime:  The implementation of a specialized unit last year in Columbus, Indiana called Community Oriented Policing and Problem Solving, or COPPS, allows police to focus on problem areas in the city.  Teresa Mackin of Wish TV reports that the unit doesn't take patrol calls during their shifts, which allows for more in-depth investigations and the opportunity to act proactively in an effort to target repeat offenders.  Chief of Police Jonathan Rohde says property crime has decreased in areas the unit has worked.

Immigrant Gang Arrests Decline Under Obama's Policies:  Arrests of immigrant gang members has been in rapid decline since 2013, raising concern about whether the Obama Administration regards international gang activity as a priority.  Caroline May of Breitbart reports that gang activity and the number of immigrant gang members has not declined.  South Texas Border Patrol agents' say that an increasing number of MS-13 gang members have been crossing the border since 2011.  Jessica Vaughn, an expert for the Center for Immigration Studies, emphasizes the need for greater immigration enforcement, but points out that the Obama Administration's policies, such as the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, "have shielded too many gang members from deportation."

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Prison Population Down, Payroll Up:  As the prison population drops 38 percent, the payroll costs for the CDCR have increased 5.3 percent, resulting in one third of officers earning more than $100,000 a year due to an increase in overtime hours worked.  Joel Hoffman of UT San Diego reports that overtime shifts have become a necessity due to a wave of retirements as well as recruitment classes slashed during budget crises.  Currently, four training academies are operating and are expected to generate 7,000 new recruits in the next three years to remedy the disparity.

CA's Death Row Runs out of Room:  Governor Jerry Brown is seeking $3.2 million from the California legislature for the addition of 100 cells for condemned inmates at San Quentin State Prison because the state's death row has run out of room.  Paige St. John of the LA Times reports that the death row population has increased steadily, from 646 inmates in 2006 to the current 751, and an average of 20 new death row arrivals are anticipated in each upcoming year.  Expanding death row is not out of the realm of possibility being that the prison's general population has decreased with the passage of AB 109 and Prop. 47.  Critics of the proposal emphasize Gov. Brown's failure to take steps to resume executions.

Fetal Homicide Debate Continues in CO:  Heated debates continue in Colorado over a fetus' legal rights after the brutal attack of an 8-month-pregnant woman, whose unborn child died when it was cut from her body, failed to result in a homicide charge.  Ivan Moreno and Nicholas Riccardi of the AP report that the state of Colorado has rejected fetal homicide proposals twice, fearing they could interfere with abortion rights.  Current law states that a person can face a murder charge in the death of a fetus "only if there is evidence that it survived apart from its mother."  In this case, there was no such evidence.

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