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Kate Steinle's Family File Legal Claims:  The family of Kate Steinle, the young woman who was fatally shot two months ago in San Francisco by an illegal immigrant, filed wrongful death claims Tuesday against the sheriff of San Francisco, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM).  Vic Lee of ABC 7 reports that in the suit, the Steinle family blames San Francisco Sheriff Ross Mirkarimi, who "made himself the king, judge and jury," ordering his deputies not to notify ICE on deportation detainees.  The second claim is against ICE, who the Steinles believe knew about Mirkarimi's lack of cooperation but did nothing to retrieve the man who would later murder their daughter.  The last claim names the Federal Bureau of Land Management, whose agent left his government-issued firearm inside his parked vehicle, which was stolen and allegedly used in the crime.  On July 1, 32-year-old Kate Steinle was fatally shot by Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, an illegal immigrant that had been deported five times and had a criminal record consisting of seven felonies.  "The system failed my sister," says Kate's brother, Brad Steinle, adding "At this point, nobody has taken responsibility, accountability.  And nothing has changed."

Judge Refuses to Dismiss Charges in Freddie Gray Case:  Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Barry Williams denied a defense motion at a pretrial hearing Wednesday that argued for charges to be dropped against the six officers in the death of Freddie Gray, as well as another motion calling for the recusal of Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby.  Ian Simpson of Reuters reports that attorneys for the six officers sought to have their clients' charges dropped due to prosecutorial misconduct on part of Mosby, though Judge Williams ruled that her controversial announcement of the charges to the predominantly black city "did not warrant dropping charges."  All six officers face second-degree assault, reckless endangerment and misconduct in office charges in the April death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray, who died a week after suffering a severe spinal cord injury while in police custody.  Three of the officers also face manslaughter charges, while the driver of the police van faces an additional charge of second-degree murder.  Protesters rallied outside the Baltimore courthouse, prompting law enforcement to enhance security.  Another pretrial hearing is scheduled for September 10, and the trial is set to begin October 13.

Hunt Widens for 3 Suspects in Death of Illinois Officer:  Hundreds of officers, dozens of police dogs and numerous helicopters continued an intensive manhunt Wednesday for three suspects who fatally shot an Illinois police officer on Tuesday morning.  The AP reports that officers are saturating the Lake County area, about an hour north of Chicago, leading to school lockdowns and the urging of residents to remain inside their locked homes.  All that is known about the suspects at this time is that one is black and two are white, as described by Lt. Charles Joseph Gliniewicz in the radio call he made shortly before he died from his injuries.  Gliniewicz, a three-decade member of the Fox Lake, Illinois police department and father of four sons, is the third law enforcement officer killed this year in the state.  His death reinforces the growing concern around the country that police officers are being deliberately targeted.

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MO Man Faces Execution After 26 Years on Death Row:  A convicted murderer scheduled to be executed Tuesday evening in Missouri for the 1989 kidnapping, rape and murder of a 15-year-old girl is having his final appeals considered by the U.S. Supreme Court.  The AP reports that over two decades ago, Roderick Nunley, now 50, and accomplice Michael Taylor, who was executed last year, kidnapped Ann Harrison from the driveway of her Kansas City home as she waited for the school bus and took her to Nunley's mother's home, where she was raped and sodomized, then stabbed several times in the stomach and neck.  Her body was discovered three days later in the trunk of a car the two men stole on the day of her murder.  If the remaining appeals are rejected, Nunley will be the sixth death row inmate to be executed this year in the state.

Man who Killed Houston Officer had History of Mental Illness:  The man charged in Friday's ambush murder of a Houston sheriff's deputy at a gas station had a history of mental illness and was at one time declared mentally incompetent.  The AP reports that 30-year-old Shannon Miles has a criminal history dating back to 2005, including a 2012 arrest for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon that led to him being committed to a state mental hospital for several months.  He faced seven years in prison for the assault charge and was declared mentally incompetent, but the charge was later dropped when authorities could not locate the victim.  Last Friday, Miles opened fire from behind on 47-year-old Sheriff's Deputy Darren Goforth, firing a total of 15 shots, killing him.

Protests Planned Around Freddie Gray Hearings:  Hearings are to begin Wednesday in the case against six Baltimore police officers charged in the April arrest and death of Freddie Gray, and police prepare for possible unrest as at least 350 activists plan to protest at the courthouse and elsewhere in the city.  Kevin Rector of the Baltimore Sun reports that at the hearings, prosecutors and defense attorneys are to argue before the judge a number of issues, including whether the case should be dismissed, if Baltimore State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby should be recused, if the six officers should be tried together or separately and whether there should be a charge of venue for the trial, which is scheduled to begin October 13.  The Baltimore Police Department as well as the Baltimore Sheriff's Office "canceled leave to maximize availability of city officers" in anticipation of possible conflict.  In April, 25-year-old Gray died after suffering a spinal cord injury while in police custody, sparking protests against police brutality that erupted in citywide rioting, looting and arson.

TX Gang Threat Heightened by Drug Cartels:  According to the latest assessment by the Texas Department of Public Safety, gangs in Texas are especially threatening due to their "propensity for violence and close associations with ruthless Mexican cartels."  The Statesman reports that the state's Tier 1 gangs - Tango Blast and Tango cliques, the Texas Syndicate, the Texas Mexican Mafia, MS-13 and the Latin Kings - pose a significant threat to public safety because of their connections with the Mexicans cartels, cross-border crime, overall statewide presence and extremely high levels of violence.  Together, these gangs have a statewide membership totaling over 100,000.

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CA's Death Penalty Delay Put on Trial:  In a case that may head to the U.S. Supreme Court, the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals heard argument this morning in its review of a Los Angeles federal judge's 2014 ruling declaring California's death penalty unconstitutional due to "systemic delays" that render the practice, in the judge's determination, arbitrary and unconstitutional.  Howard Mintz of the San Jose Mercury News reports that U.S. District Judge Cormac Carney concluded in the case of Jones v. Davis, involving a convicted murderer who has been on death row for two decades, that California's death penalty has transformed into "life in prison, with the remote possibility of death."  Attorney General Kamala Harris has urged the appeals court to reverse the decision despite her opposition to the death penalty, pointing out that any delays in reviewing a death row inmate's appeals "are meant to ensure legal protections to avoid mistakes."  Attorneys for death row inmates argue that the problem is not fixable; though CJLF legal director Kent Scheidegger emphasizes the state of Virginia's success in fixing their system and the execution of the D.C. sniper in less than six years.  Another factor for delays in executions is the ongoing legal challenges to the state's lethal injection method that, when resolved, will allow 17 death row inmates who have exhausted all legal appeals to receive immediate execution dates.

Houston Cop Ambushed at a Gas Station:  A Houston deputy was ambushed and killed Friday while refueling his car a gas station when a gunman unloaded the entire clip of his .40 caliber pistol at close range, unleashing a total of 15 shots into the officer.  Fox News reports that 47-year-old Deputy Darren Goforth, a 10-year veteran, was shot in the back of the head by 30-year-old Shannon J. Miles, who then stood over the officer's body and unloaded his remaining ammo.  Miles, who has a lengthy rap sheet, was identified through surveillance footage, and a .40 caliber pistol found in the garage of his home was determined through ballistics to be the murder weapon.  His mother claims her son's innocence, insisting that the two were shopping together at the time of the shooting.  An attorney for Miles says that Miles indicated to officers that he was not involved and is expected to plead not guilty.  The motive for the crime is still unclear.

Kate Steinle's Murder Prompts Some Cooperation:  The July 1 death of a young woman at the hands of an illegal immigrant with a criminal record has prompted four Bay Area counties - Alameda, Contra Costa, San Mateo and Marin - to agree to notify U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) when inmates flagged by the agency for possible deportation are about to be released.  Tracey Kaplan of the San Jose Mercury News reports that Alameda County has already notified ICE of almost 100 inmates over the past seven weeks, 20 of whom federal agents have taken into custody, while Contra Costa County is notifying federal authorities of only those inmates who have committed serious or violent crimes.  Immigrant-rights advocates argue that notifying ICE of pending releases undermines immigrants' trust in police, and the sheriff of San Francisco, the sanctuary city this heated political issue spawned from, "has no plans to cooperate with ICE."  Two months ago, 32-year-old Kate Steinle was shot and killed by an illegal immigrant with a long criminal history, including five deportations, as she walked along a pier in San Francisco.  The immigrant, Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, had been released by San Francisco authorities without notifying ICE.

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Parole Recommended for Charles Manson Follower:  Parole officials announced Thursday that, after 43 years in prison and 30 parole hearings, they have decided that it is safe to free one of Charles Manson's followers.  Don Thompson of the AP reports that 72-year-old Bruce Davis, serving a life sentence for two counts of first degree murder and conspiracy to commit murder and robbery in the slayings of musician Gary Hinman and stuntman Donald "Shorty" Shea in 1969, has had similar parole recommendations blocked three times, once by former Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and twice by Gov. Jerry Brown.  Brown has stated that Davis is still a danger to the public despite his age.  Though Davis was not a participant in the highly-publicized murders of actress Sharon Tate and six others, "the lesser-known slayings are plenty to keep him behind bars," says Los Angeles Deputy District Attorney John Morris.  Gov. Brown will decide on Thursday's recommendation in approximately five months.

Tourist Robbery Points to Rise in SF Property Crime:  San Francisco is experiencing a dramatic rise in property crime this year, exemplified by the Tuesday robbery and shooting of a tourist from Thailand over his camera.  KTVU reports that "smash and grabs" and muggings have become increasingly popular among criminals, who are attracted to small but valuable items such as cameras, cell phones and iPads as a quick way to make money and spend little or no time behind bars.  Many in law enforcement are pointing fingers at Prop. 47, the ballot measure passed by voters last November which reduces shoplifting and grand theft to misdemeanors, so long as the value of the stolen item is less than $950.  Since San Francisco is known to be lenient toward such crimes, career criminals are "gaming the system," says San Francisco Police Chief Greg Suhr.  With property crime up 20 percent in the city compared to the same time last year, Suhr urges amendments be made to current laws to ensure criminals do the time for their crimes.

Previously Deported Illegal Immigrant Accused of Sexual Assault:  Pearland, Texas police are in the process of tracking down a previously deported illegal immigrant sex offender who allegedly sexually assaulted a 16-year-old girl with Down syndrome at her home on Monday.  Jerome Hudson of Breitbart reports that 25-year-old Jesus Atrian, a family friend of the victim, was previously deported to his native Mexico for a prior conviction of indecency with a child in August 2014, for which he pleaded guilty and was sentenced to eight years of probation and required to register as a sex offender.  He was then released to ICE officials who reportedly deported him to Mexico.  Police are concerned that he has absconded to Mexico and are asking the public for help locating him.

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Albuquerque School Hired Fugitive Pedophile:  A man being considered to become second-in-command at Albuquerque Public Schools in New Mexico was revealed Wednesday as a fugitive on the run from police in two states, facing multiple outstanding child sex abuse charges in Colorado.  Joseph J. Kolb of Fox News reports that 50-year-old Timothy Martinez was hired in June as the district's deputy superintendent using the alias Jason Martinez, but quit abruptly in August after dodging multiple fingerprint and background checks.  He faces charges of sexual contact with a boy under the age of 15 and 16, which prompted his resignation at Denver Public Schools in Colorado.  He was released on bond before relocating to New Mexico, though he was barred from leaving Colorado.  Martinez was personally appointed by the district's current superintendent, Luis Valentino, without submitting a resume, though Valentino denies knowledge of the allegations.  Martinez was arrested Wednesday when he returned to Denver.

Court Rules Illegal Immigrants Have 2nd Amendment Rights:  In the case of United States v. Meza-Rodriguez, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit determined that illegal immigrants have Second Amendment rights.  Awr Hawkins of Breitbart reports that in August 2013, Mexican national Mariano Meza-Rodriguez was arrested, found to be in possession of a .22 caliber cartridge but lacking documentation, and was subsequently indicted.  He challenged the indictment, claiming it "impermissibly infringed on his rights under the Second Amendment of the Constitution."  Judge Diane Wood ruled, relying on the language in District of Columbia v. Heller (2008), "that all people, including non-U.S. citizens, whether or not they are authorized to be in this country, enjoy at least some rights under the Second Amendment."

LA Police Officer, Victim Dead After Shooting, Stabbing:  A Louisiana police officer was shot and killed Wednesday when he responded to a triple stabbing that killed one woman and injured two others, after which the suspect crashed his car into a convenience store and barricaded himself in an office demanding a fight.  Fox News reports that the suspect, 35-year-old Harrison Riley Jr., is the cousin of the slain officer, 51-year-old Henry Nelson, and shot the officer with his own handgun.  The violence began when 40-year-old Shameka Johnson, among the deceased, and 34-year-old Shurlay Johnson, her sister, intervened in an argument that Riley was having with his wife.  When Officer Nelson arrived, a fight between them ensued.  Nelson is the second Louisiana police officer killed in four days and the fifth in four months.  Riley was arrested after a two-hour standoff and faces charges of first-degree murder, first-degree murder of a police officer, two counts of attempted first-degree murder, criminal damage to property and resisting arrest.

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News Journalists Killed on Live TV:  Two Virginia TV news journalists for WDBJ7, a reporter and a cameraman, were shot and killed on live television Wednesday morning, allegedly by a disgruntled employee.  Fox News reports that following the shooting of 24-year-old Alison Parker, 27-year-old Adam Ward, and an interviewee, who survived a gunshot wound to her back, Virginia State Police homed in on 41-year-old Vester Lee Flanagan, a former employee of WDBJ7 who went by the name Bryce Williams, while he was driving on the freeway.  The suspect refused to stop, ran his vehicle off the road and crashed, and then fatally shot himself.  Flanagan, who was fired from the station several years ago, made several posts on social media following the attack, including a first-person video he took during the murder and remarks about Parker's "racist comments" and his anger over Ward reporting him to the HR department.  He was reportedly angered by the Charleston rampage that occurred at a church in June, in which a white man gunned down nine black churchgoers. 

Father Loses Efforts to Remove Daughters from Sex Offender's Home:  The Nebraska Court of Appeals rejected a man's attempt to gain custody of his two teenage daughters after his ex-wife married a registered sex offender, who served four years in prison for the attempted sexual assault of his 15-year-old stepdaughter from a previous marriage.  Joe Duggan of the World-Herald Bureau reports that the girls' mother, who won primary custody of them after the 2004 divorce, moved in with the sex offender in 2011, marking her second relationship with a sex offender.  Her first occurred shortly after the end of her first marriage, and the man was later convicted of sexually assaulted her 5-year-old daughter, who is not party to the current custody dispute.  Nebraska law does not require automatic removal of children from homes shared by sex offenders so long as the count finds that there is "no significant risk of harm," which was supported by the girls' mental health therapist, testifying that there "appeared to be good boundaries" in the home.  No testimony was offered from a mental health specialist who interviewed the sex offender to determine risk of recidivism.

Lawsuit Settlement Allows Deportees to Return to U.S.:  Six of the nine illegal immigrants who filed a class-action lawsuit accusing the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and the Border Patrol in Southern California of using coercive tactics to pressure them into voluntarily leaving the U.S. were allowed to return to the U.S. Tuesday.  Tatiana Sanchez of the San Diego Union-Tribune reports that the lawsuit was filed by the ACLU in 2013, stating that the illegal immigrants, all of whom are Mexican nationals with U.S.-citizen family members, were deprived of their right to be heard by an immigration judge before they signed documents authorizing their deportation.  ICE officials say that voluntary returns to home countries "remain an important option" for illegal immigrants and coercion is not tolerated in the agency.  The president of the union that represents San Diego Border Patrol agents also denies any coercion, trickery or force involved in their interactions with the immigrants.  The immigrants who were returned will be allowed to stay with family members while their cases are handled by immigration court, "a process that can take several years."

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Dallas Police Face Unfair Discipline, Stress:  Officers in the Dallas Police Department have been taking longer to respond to 911 calls, partly due to officers being "mentally beaten down," according to the head of the Dallas Police Association.  J.D. Miles of CBS DFW reports that the association's president, Ron Pinkston, says that many of the 3,000 officers he represents "are moving slower because of concerns over safety and fears about violating department policies."  Dallas Police Chief David Brown attributes new training requirements to the slower responses to priority one calls, which at eight minutes and 13 seconds is the highest it has been in three years.  Ultimately, there is a lack of motivation within the force due to the fear of doing the right thing coupled with the fear that "nobody's going to support them."

Illegal Immigrant Carjacks Woman Minutes After Release:  An illegal immigrant, who had previously been deported, violently carjacked a woman 30 minutes after his release from jail.  Josh Fatzick of the Daily Caller reports that 24-year-old Guaynar Cabrera-Hernandez was released last Monday from the Montgomery County Detention Center in Washington, D.C., and approached a woman in a parking lot while wielding a knife and a brick, put the knife to her throat, forced her out of the car and hurled the brick at her before speeding off in her vehicle.  He struck again two days later, throwing a bottle at the head of a 68-year-old woman and taking her vehicle, crashing through a security gate with police in pursuit and apprehended when he attempted to flee on foot.  Cabrera-Hernandez was arrested in 2007 for being in the country illegally, and then again in 2011 for which he was subsequently deported.  According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), Cabrera-Hernandez's past crimes did not meet the agency's "civil immigration enforcement priorities."  Currently, he is wanted in Maryland for an outstanding armed carjacking warrant and is in custody.

Prop. 47: 'A Well-Intentioned Blunder':  In this column on the San Diego Source, Thomas D. Elias acknowledges that Proposition 47, a ballot measure passed by a 60-40 margin last November that downgrades several felonies to misdemeanors, is a bad policy that endangers Californians.  With crime statistics for the first half of the year pouring out from around the state showing, to name but a few, a 47 percent increase in car burglaries in San Francisco and a 12.7 percent increase in overall crime in Los Angeles, "this measure looks worse and worse."  The consequences of Prop. 47, as Elias points out, are plentiful.  Criminals are adjusting their practices by stealing less than $950 worth of goods to avoid a felony charge. Enrollment in drug treatment programs have dropped now that addicts are relieved of the pressure to kick their habits, knowing they'll never do serious time.  Persons with prior convictions of crimes such as carjacking, armed robbery, child abuse and assault with a deadly weapon are not facing jail time because those crimes qualify for misdemeanor status for new non-violent offenses.  "Now it's time for legislators to fix this flawed measure," says Elias.

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LA Trooper Shot and Killed:  A Louisiana state trooper responding to reports of a possible intoxicated individual driving erratically, stopped Sunday afternoon to assist a man whose pickup truck had run into a ditch and was shot in the head when the man emerged from the truck with a sawed-off shotgun.  The trooper died of his injuries Monday morning.  Fox News reports that 43-year-old Senior Trooper Steven Vincent, a 13-year veteran of the state police, was shot by 54-year-old Kevin Daigle, a man whose record includes multiple DWIs and other arrests he refused to discuss.  The incident, caught on dash cam video, came to an end when two or three drivers stopped immediately, wrestled the gun out of Daigle's hands and handcuffed him with the officer's pair.  Daigle faces several charges, including first-degree murder of a police officer.  He is also being probed in the death of his roommate, found deceased on Monday, to determine whether he may have a connection to the homicide.

Last Month the Bloodiest in NY Jails:  New York City's jails surged with gang violence in the month of July, making it the bloodiest month behind bars in 15 years.  Reuven Blau of NY Daily News reports that records show a total of 21 slashings and one stabbing occurred last month in the facilities, with 16 of those incidents involving members of the Bloods, Crips or Latin Kings.  These figures have increased from last year, which only saw an average to seven slashings and stabbings in a month.  Prison officials believe that continued gang disputes on the streets are spilling over into the jails, and have also been openly critical of Correction Commissioner Joseph Ponte's reform to reduce the number of inmates placed in solitary confinement, which is thought to be contributing to the increased mayhem.

No Clear Answer for Crimes Spikes in U.S. Cities:  "There really is no particular reason," said LAPD's central division Captain Mike Oreb regarding Los Angeles' 12 percent spike in overall crime, with violent offenses rising more than 20 percent, a pattern that is resonating with major cities nationwide.  Haya El Nasser of Al Jazeera America reports that Los Angeles prosecutors and law enforcement officers are pointing fingers at a change in the crime reporting system and, most especially, to Prop. 47, a voter-approved initiative passed in November that downgrades certain felonies, including drug possession and theft, to misdemeanors.  However, Los Angeles does not stand alone in this trend, as Baltimore, New York, Chicago, Houston, Milwaukee, Dallas, St. Louis, San Antonio, New Orleans and Washington, D.C., are all reporting double-digit surges in murders in the first half of this year.  When asked if the numbers signify a reversal of decreasing crime trends the country has been experiencing for decades, president of the Police Foundation, Jim Bueermann, says "I don't think we really know."

Sex Offenders, Convicted Murderers Among CA Uber Drivers:  Uber, a ridesharing company that has given taxi drivers stiff competition, is accused of hiring drivers with criminal histories, including sex offenders and a convicted murderer, detailed in a consumer-protection lawsuit filed by San Francisco District Attorney George Gascon.  Mario Sevilla of KRON 4 reports that the complaint says that among the drivers that passed Uber's self-described "industry leading" background check were several registered sex offenders, a kidnapper, identity thieves, burglars and a convicted murderer who was hired less than seven years after being paroled, going on to provide 1,168 rides.  Gascon says that the company cannot "unfairly claim it is rigorously checking the background of its drivers" unless those drivers are put through the same fingerprinting process required of taxi drivers in California.  An Uber spokeswoman voiced her disagreement with Gascon's complaint, claiming that the process used by taxi companies is not "an inherently better system for screening drivers than our background checks."

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Teen Girls to be tried as Adults in Stabbing:  Two 13-year-old Wisconsin girls are to be tried as adults in the 2014 stabbing of their friend, whom they were attempting to murder as a sacrifice to a fictitious horror character.  Greg Moore of the AP reports that the two girls, both 12 at the time of the crime, plotted in advance to lure their friend, Payton Leutner, into the woods during a sleepover, where they repeatedly stabbed her.  They did to win the favor of Slender Man, an imaginary character that has proliferated online in recent years.  The two girls told police that they believed they would be invited to live in Slender Man's mansion in exchange for killing Leutner, who miraculously survived the attack despite being stabbed 19 times.  Both girls pleaded not guilty on Friday to charges of attempted first-degree intentional homicide and face 65 years in prison if convicted as adults.  An appeals court could move the cases to juvenile court, where the two, if convicted, would be released with no supervision or mental health treatment at the age of 18.

No Protests for Murder of 9-year-old in Ferguson:  A nine-year-old girl was shot and killed while doing homework on her mother's bed in Ferguson, Mo. Tuesday evening, yet a Wednesday night protest was concerned only with the officer-involved shooting of an armed suspect who pointed a gun at police.  Fox News reports that whoever fired a gun through the home of Jamyla Bolden has not been identified, though the girl's relatives believe police are focusing on a person of interest who likely targeted the wrong house in the fatal drive-by shooting.  Bolden's mother suffered a non-fatal gunshot wound to the leg and was released from the hospital Wednesday.  

Crime Up in Riverside County:  The total number of violent and property crimes reported to the Riverside County Sheriff's Department increased in the first six months of 2015 compared to the first six months of 2014.  Brian Rokos and Ali Tadayon of the Press Enterprise report that the latest statistics reveal a 6.3 percent increase in violent crimes and a 2.2 percent increase in property crimes.  In just the unincorporated areas of the county, violent crimes have risen more than 15 percent while property crimes have jumped 7.7 percent.  A possible reason for the uptick, says LA area law professor Steven Lurie, is the "twin influences of Prop. 47 and realignment."  Prop. 47, approved by voters last November, downgrades certain felonies to misdemeanors and realignment, or AB 109,  transferred thousands of so called  "non-violent, non-serious, non-sexual" offenders from state prison to county jails, forcing Riverside County to release thousands of inmates early to accommodate criminals no longer eligible for prison.  Prop. 47 has been in effect for less than one year, and the sheriff's department will wait to assess a full year's worth of crime data before weighing in on specific impacts of Prop. 47 alone.

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Nine Protesters Arrested After Shooting in St. Louis:  Nine people were arrested in St. Louis after an armed black man evading arrest was shot and killed by white police officers when he pointed a gun at them.  Fox News reports that officers were dispatched to the home of 18-year-old Mansur Ball-Bey to serve a warrant, and fatally shot him as he pointed his firearm at them while attempting to flee.  Afterwards, a group of protesters blocked an intersection, hurled bricks and glass bottles at officers and refused orders to clear the roadway.  St. Louis Police Chief Sam Dotson believes the crimes and actions of the protesters stem from "people seeking notoriety in a neighborhood plagued by violence." Protests over police brutality have been a common in the crime plagued neighborhood since the fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown last year.

Mexican Cartels Controlling the AZ Desert:  An Arizona sheriff says that U.S. sovereignty is gone for hundreds, perhaps even thousands, of square miles throughout the American southwest, and that "nobody" has operational control of the region.  Matthew Boyle of Breitbart reports that Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu, while on a helicopter tour with GOP presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson, pointed out scores of scout sites for cartel operatives, located as far as 70 miles north of the border, that serve as lookouts for smugglers bringing drugs, people and other contraband into the U.S.  The Mexican cartels and illegal immigrants "shouldn't be 70 miles inside the border.  We should stop them at the border," says Dr. Carson. 

Proposed Law on Race, Police Draws Debate:  A fierce debate erupted during a public hearing inside packed City Council Chambers in Binghampton, New York Wednesday night over a proposed law that supporters say ensures to equal treatment of all residents by police and improves the department's relationship with the community.  Megan Brockett of Press Connects reports that the Police Modernization Law, calls for broader data collection and analysis of stops by police, mandatory cultural competency and anti-racism training for all officers and a new plan for adding greater diversity to the force.  The law's inclusion of the phrase "probable cause" in the definition of racial profiling, would bar officers from using "reasonable suspicion" while dealing with suspects.  

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AZ Sheriff Blasts Feds for Releasing Violent Immigrants:  An Arizona sheriff expressed his outrage Tuesday over a U.S Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) policy that set free three violent criminal aliens in the last week, and called the agency's new Law Enforcement Notification System "too little, too late."  Perry Chiaramonte of Fox News reports that Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu spoke of his frustration at a news conference alongside family members of crime victims, spotlighting three criminals released into his jurisdiction.  They included a Russian national who set a police informant on fire, an Iraqi who killed his two-year-old daughter and an illegal from Sudan who committed multiple assaults in two states.  ICE claims that under current law, they were unable to legally hold the three, two of whom were released because their travel documents could not be located, called a "bureaucratic excuse" by Babeu.  Though ICE defends their efforts to promote public safety by notifying local agencies of releases of criminal aliens, "by simply notifying sheriffs of the release of dangerous criminals doesn't address the core problem that these dangerous criminals remain in America," said Babeu.

Subway Pitchman Pleads Guilty to Porn:  Jared Fogle, the former Subway Pitchman and well-known face of the sandwich chain, reached a plea deal Wednesday, stating that he intends to plead guilty to child pornography charges and crossing state lines to pay for sex with minors.  Mariano Castillo of CNN reports that the plea agreement, which recommends that Fogle serve between five and 12 ½ years in prison, will have to be approved by the court.  He will also be required to pay restitution to 14 victims in the amount of $100,000 each.  The charges stem from Fogle's relationship with Russell C. Taylor, the executive director of the Jared Foundation charity, who was arrested over two months ago on federal child porn charges and whose home was equipped with hidden cameras that captured the images and videos in Fogle's possession.  Subway severed ties with Fogle earlier this year following an FBI raid of his home.

Arrests on the Rise in Baltimore:  Arrests are increasing in Baltimore, a positive turn following the summer's "domino effect" of crime, says Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake.  Yvonne Wenger of the Baltimore Sun reports that the mayor says that beginning three and half weeks ago, drug arrests and gun seizures have been rising, though she didn't provide specific figures.  With assistance from federal agencies such as the FBI, DEA, ATFE and U.S. Marshals Service, the city, which saw crime spiral out of control after the death of Freddie Gray in April, "has been able to build more cases against repeat offenders."

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CA Lawmen Protest Parole of Cop Killer:  Unions representing Los Angeles police and California prosecutors have joined   the widow of a slain LAPD detective in an attempt to block the parole a man who indirectly helped murder him 30 years ago.  Dana Bartholomew of the LA Daily News reports that on August 4, two members of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) recommended the parole of 52-year-old Voltaire Williams, who is serving a sentence of 25 years to life for conspiracy to commit murder in the death of 42-year-old LAPD Detective Thomas C. Williams (no relation) in 1985. Williams, 26-years-old in 1985, was hired by a man named Daniel S. Jenkins to kill the policeman for $2,000, but didn't go through with it.  Jenkins ended up doing the deed himself, gunning down the officer in front of his six-year-old son.  Critics of Williams' parole believe that the state is trying to "empty out overcrowded penitentiaries by releasing inmates such as Williams on good behavior," noting that 900 such lifers were granted parole this past year.  

Surging Immigration Backlog Overwhelms Judges:  Working conditions for the country's 247 immigration judges are growing progressively worse each year, and 130 of them will be eligible to retire this fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30.  Molly Hennessy-Fiske of the LA Times reports that according to the Immigration Policy Center, immigration judges typically handle more than 1,400, and some even handle over 3,000 cases at a time, totaling to a massive backlog of more than 450,000 cases, exacerbated by the increasing number of Central American youths seeking asylum.  Judges across the country are outraged at the unmanageable working conditions, and say that the courts need to hire an additional 100 judges "immediately."  An immigration court spokeswoman insists that officials in the U.S. attorney general's office have begun "an aggressive hiring process."

Boston Bomber Wants New Trial, Changed Venue:  In a court filing Monday, Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev's defense attorneys said that their client deserves a new trial in a different location "where jurors will be impartial."  The AP reports that their argument states that the widespread outrage and emotional media coverage following the 2013 attack that left three people dead and several others injured prevented Boston jurors from looking at the case or the defendant objectively before finding him guilty and sentencing him to death.  The attorneys request that Tsarnaev's sentence be overturned and the court order a new trial.  The filing also includes arguments, citing a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling that "throws many of [Tsarnaev's] convictions into question," believing that he should be acquitted of 15 convictions that were for crimes of violence because the trial court failed to explain which part of the definition they met.

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Illegal Immigrant Charged in Triple Homicide:  An illegal immigrant has been charged in the deaths of his aunt, pregnant cousin, and the cousin's boyfriend in an "extremely violent" triple homicide in Florida.  NBC2 reports that 37-year-old Dorla Pitts, 17-year-old Starlette Pitts, who was six months pregnant, and 19-year-old Michael Kelly Jr. were hit several times with a sharp object by 19-year-old Brian Omar Hyde, though specific details regarding the murder weapon have not been released.  Starlette Pitts' and Kelly's 18-month-old daughter was also found at the scene, but unharmed.  Hyde entered the U.S. illegally in January from Belize, where he is connected to several crimes and allegedly comes from a "known criminal family."  Hyde faces three counts of second-degree murder as well as a charge in the death of Starlette Pitts' unborn child.

Detective Hesitated to Shoot Attacker Due to Headlines:  A police detective in Birmingham, Alabama who was pistol-whipped unconscious said he was hesitant to use force "because he didn't want to be accused of needlessly killing an unarmed man."  Nick Valencia of CNN reports that the incident unraveled last Friday when the six-year police veteran, who remains anonymous, pulled over a vehicle that was driving erratically and the driver refused to stay in the car while the officer called for backup.  The officer says that last thing he remembers is "getting sucker-punched in a parking lot.  The next thing, he's waking up in a hospital with staples in his head."  The suspect, 34-year-old Janard Cunningham, is accused of pistol whipping the officer with the officer's service weapon and has been charged with attempted murder.  The officer is recovering at home and says "I hesitated [to use force] because I didn't want to be in the media like I am now."

Sheriffs Blast ICE over Immigration Policy:  Sheriffs and police officers in California and Arizona are blasting U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) over detainer policies they say free violent illegal immigrants.  Malia Zimmerman of Fox News reports that while ICE may ask local departments to hold prisoners until they can take custody of them for deportation, local departments fear that they open themselves up to lawsuits; the law does not grant them authority to place an ICE hold on illegal immigrants unless there is a warrant.  Meanwhile, a two-year-old girl California girl continues to fight for her life after her mother's live-in boyfriend, illegal immigrant Francisco Javier Chavez, brutally beat her late July, leaving her with two broken arms, a broken femur, a compressed spine, a urinary tract infection and a 107 degree fever.  Chavez - whose criminal history includes assault and drug convictions and arrests for kidnapping, carjacking and cruelty to a child - is currently out on bail for the attack.  Local law enforcement agencies in California are united, demanding that the law be fixed.

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Early Releases Common Under Prop 47:  Proposition 47, California's voter-approved initiative passed in November that downgrades certain felonies to misdemeanors, is concerning law enforcement and other county officials in San Diego County, which saw prison sentences automatically lowered for 5,000 convicted felons after its passage.  Salvador Rivera of Fox 5 San Diego reports that San Diego County Chief Deputy District Attorney David Greenberg emphasizes that not only is the policy failing to help communities and keep crime down, it also falls short of helping deter defendants from future criminal behavior, since they no longer face felony probation and, thus, have no incentive to participate in programs.  Greenberg offered an example of one man in the county who robbed a business four hours after being released from jail, which was the first of five total times since his release.  However, he avoided prison time because, as per Prop. 47, the stolen merchandise was valued at less than $950.

CA Probation Chief wants to Arm Officers:  Plumas County acting probation chief wants to arm his officers due to the implications of prison realignment, or AB 109, which has created a larger and more dangerous population of probationers, many of which require more intensive supervision.  Dan McDonald of Plumas County News reports that acting probation chief Clint Armitage says the probationers coming out of prison "are more sophisticated that just local people" and believes that the situation would be best approached proactively since probationer officers are now required to do field work in many of these cases.  Plumas County Sheriff Greg Hagwood said  "Having armed probationer officers will hold people accountable in meaningful ways - especially in the world we live in now with criminal justice realignment."  Armitage has requested $300,000 from the county's $515,000 AB 109 allotment through the Community Corrections Partnership to pay for it.  The decision to provide probation officers with firearms is ultimately up to the Board of Supervisors.

Infamous 'San Quentin 6' Inmate Murdered:  A member of the infamous 'San Quentin 6,' an inmate who was involved in a bloody 1971 escape attempt that left six people dead, has been killed by another inmate.  The AP reports that 71-year-old Hugo Pinell's murder sparked a riot on the exercise yard of a California's Folsom Prison east of Sacramento Wednesday, which involved approximately 70 inmates, 11 of whom had to be treated for stab wounds at outside hospitals.  Over four decades ago, Pinell slit the throats of San Quentin prison guards while attempting to escape, leading to the deaths of three guards, two inmate trustees and the escape ringleader.  Initially sentenced to life in prison for a 1965 rape charge, Pinell received a second life sentence for killing a correctional officer at a prison in Soledad and yet another life sentence for the assault of the two officers in the San Quentin escape.  CDCR spokeswoman Dana Simas says that Pinell "was definitely the target."

5 Killed, 7 Injured in One Violent Boston Night:  A spurt of violence Wednesday night and early Thursday morning around the Boston area left five people dead and several others injured.  Jan Ransom and Laura Crimaldi of the Boston Globe report that all of the victims were shot and detectives believe that the shootings were not random, though the motive is still being investigated.  The suspect or suspects are still at large, and officials plan to distribute fliers in the area in an effort to obtain information from any witness.

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More Arrests Amid Ferguson Chaos:  As of Monday night in Ferguson, Missouri, the fourth consecutive night of demonstrations marking the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death, at least 23 people were arrested after peaceful protests spiraled into chaos following Sunday evening gunfire.  Fox News reports that by Monday evening, after St. Louis County Executive Steven Stenger declared a state of emergency, hundreds of demonstrators gathered at the sight of last year's protests, marching, chanting, beating drums and carrying signs.  Water bottles and other debris were thrown at officers by some demonstrators, and at least nine were accused of resisting or interfering with an arrest.  About 144 protesters were arrested around the St. Louis area as of Monday, however, there were no injuries or property damage.

Obama Admin. Launches Campaign to Deter Immigration:  Last month, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, backed by the Obama administration, kicked off its "Know the Facts" awareness campaign in Mexico, El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras in an effort to discourage people from immigrating to the U.S. illegally.  Carolina May of Breitbart reports that last year, more than 68,400 family units and more than 68,541 unaccompanied minors surged at the U.S. southern border, under the impression that lax immigration laws would prevent deportations, and that "permisos," or free passes, were plentiful.  Although this year's numbers show a drop in immigrants from Central American, a late July ruling calling for an end to detention of illegal immigrant family units could hinder the campaign, by "incentivizing adults to bring children with them on their dangerous journey as a means to avoid detention and gain access to the interior of the U.S."

"Yes means Yes" Policy Under Fire:  Judges in California, Tennessee and Virginia are saying "no" to the "yes means yes" standard of affirmative consent for date rape, on the grounds that it violates the due process rights of the accused.  Cody Derespina of Fox News reports that under the standard - which has been adopted by several college campuses nationwide - the accused has to prove he obtained consent, even if neither party remembers, forcing him to prove his own innocence, rather than be proven guilty.  The standard came in response to lawsuits brought against colleges by individuals found guilty of sexual misconduct who were not provided with adequate due process.  In one case, the accused was unable to cross-examine his accuser and other witnesses.  A student at another school was found guilty because he couldn't prove he obtained verbal consent.  John Banzhaf, a professor at George Washington University Law School, says that while not every element of protection for the accused must be provided in every case, a "minimal amount of procedural protection," such as the right to cross-examine witnesses, is required in all cases.

Spike in Violence, Officer-Involved Shootings in San Jose:  A murderer free on parole and suspected in a violent stabbing was shot by police, and a suicidal man took his own life during a confrontation with another officer, marking San Jose, California's second and third officer-involved shootings in just over a week.  Robert Salonga and Mark Gomez of the San Jose Mercury News reports that the city's police department recently increased its presence amid a spike in violence, with the city experiencing 10 homicides in the past six weeks compared to a total of eight in the first six months of 2014.  So far this year, there have been six officer-involved shootings versus five such shootings in all of 2014.  Although the San Jose Police Department is not particularly surprised with the uptick in violence, Assistant Chief Eddie Garcia says "What strikes us is suspects increasingly confronting our officers.  That's alarming."

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