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Each time we have one of these horrific mass shootings, many people shake their heads and ask, "What on earth could make somebody want to do something like this?"  In most cases, the perpetrator is dead and did not plan to survive the attack.  This time we have a living perpetrator, so perhaps we will learn more.

I suspect that a strong desire to be in the headlines is part of the motivation.  Too many young people place too much emphasis on being "famous" and have lost the distinction between being famous and being infamous.  There is even a television series titled, "Murder Made Me Famous."

In December 1941, President Roosevelt famously declared that the 7th was "a day that will live in infamy."  He didn't say "fame," and everyone knew the difference.  The perpetrators would go down in history, but as villains, and that was universally regarded as a bad outcome for them.

Pretending Our Way to Murder

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This essay by Paul Mirengoff puts as starkly a I have seen the price to be paid, in honesty and in lives, for refusing to acknowledge reality because it does not square with leftist ideology.  It's hard to tell if this phenomenon is more disgusting, more tragic, or more ironic  --  the latter because it's leftist academia that brays incessantly that we need "evidence-based" this or "research-centered" that.  In truth, it could care less about what research or evidence shows.  This is visible most prominently, in criminal law debates, in the fact that the Left denounces as racist more and more aggressive policing and increased use of incarceration  --  even though overwhelming evidence shows that these things made major contributions to the decline of murder and violent crime over the last 25 years, and thus saved thousands of black lives we otherwise would have lost.

The snarling subordination of evidence to ideology is well illustrated by the race-norming of school discipline.  As Paul explains:


We're screwed if we must pretend that black students in public schools are suspended and otherwise disciplined at a disproportionately high rate (including by black teachers) mainly because of their race rather than because of their behavior and, underlying that behavior, their upbringing and family structure. And if we must therefore  relax disciplinary standards. Lest we be accused of racism.

We're screwed if we apply the same kind of fiction to adult criminals and redefine what's a crime and what's a proper criminal sentence in an attempt to create racially equal outcomes in our (until now Anglo-American) justice system. Lest we be accused of racism. 

Murder, Race and Saving Black Lives

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We don't yet know what murder statistics will be for 2017 (they were awful in 2015 and 2016, the largest two year spike in decades).  There is evidence that murders are down in NYC, Chicago, and Washington, DC.  They are up in Baltimore, St. Louis and the densely populated Northern Virginia suburbs.

A friend just sent me the statistics for St. Louis.  They're a wake-up call, and not just because of a third straight annual increase.  They demand attention because the racial breakdown of murder victims veritably shouts at us about what we need to do if we claim to believe that black lives matter.

It's easy to summarize.  We need to suppress the murder rate.

And how do we do that?  This too is easy to summarize, because we spent an entire generation (1991-2014) massively suppressing it.  We did it with more police, more aggressive policing, more overall police-citizen encounters, restraining naive sentencing, and increasing incarceration for violent and drug trafficking offenders.

It's not a matter of what is vaguely called "community trust."  A big majority already trusts the police  --  considerably more than trust the Supreme Court, schools, churches or the medical system.  It's a matter of maintaining the existing trust of everyday citizens  --  and increasing fear of the police in hoodlums and would-be hoodlums.

The Cause of Increased Homelessness

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What is the cause of the recent increase in homelessness in California?  El Cajon Mayor Bill Wells has this op-ed in the San Diego Union-Tribune placing the blame on the California Legislature and its ideological anti-personal-responsibility agenda, although he notes an ill-conceived initiative and a Supreme Court decision as well.
Robert L. Woodson has this op-ed in the WSJ with the above subtitle.

This summer, law professors Amy Wax and Larry Alexander caused a stir with an op-ed lamenting the decline of what they called "bourgeois norms." "All cultures are not equal," they rightly observed. Those that encourage self-restraint, delayed gratification, marriage and a strong work ethic tend to thrive. Those that tolerate or excuse substance abuse, out-of-wedlock pregnancy and dropping out tend to break down.
I would add obeying the law and not violating the rights of others (which are often the same thing).  See my Sept. 20 post.

Ms. Wax and Mr. Alexander were instantly accused of racism by the growing army of angry academics who police the prevailing narrative of black victimhood.
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The Bogus Theory of Implicit Bias

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Implicit bias theory has become widespread in academia.  It's used in criminal law as a high-brow form of accusing one's opponent of racism  --  i.e.,  of calling whites bigots, and therefore incapable of giving a fair shake to minorities, without seeming too nasty about it.

This is condescension impersonating charity, but that's not the worst thing about it.  The worst thing is that implicit bias theory is baloney, as Heather MacDonald illustrates here. She starts off:

Few academic ideas have been as eagerly absorbed into public discourse lately as "implicit bias." Embraced by Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and most of the press, implicit bias has spawned a multimillion-dollar consulting industry, along with a movement to remove the concept of individual agency from the law. Yet its scientific basis is crumbling. 

Implicit-bias theory burst onto the academic scene in 1998 with the rollout of an instrument called the implicit association test, the brainchild of social psychologists Anthony Greenwald and Mahzarin Banaji. A press release trumpeted the IAT as a breakthrough in prejudice studies: "The pervasiveness of prejudice, affecting 90 to 95 percent of people, was demonstrated today . . . by psychologists who developed a new tool that measures the unconscious roots of prejudice."

Teaching Kids to Hate Cops

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LifeZette posts this mind-boggling story:

The Chicago Public School system is introducing a new curriculum for eighth- and 10th-grade students....

As part of a 2015 reparations deal, Chicago public school students will be [exposed] to a new six-lesson curriculum "about Jon Burge, a former CPD detective accused of using torture, primarily on black men in his custody between the 1970s and 1990s, to force confessions to crimes," reported The Columbia Chronicle.

Burge was allegedly responsible for torturing over 200 suspects in police custody between 1972 and 1991. The Chronicle makes it clear, however, that the true motivation behind the new course of study is not to educate Chicago's youth about Burge as much as to teach the myth of systemic racism in law enforcement.

"The first lesson calls for students to discuss opinions or experiences with racism and police brutality. This precedes discussion of Burge's human-rights abuses and the police officers whose actions helped him hide his crimes," reported The Chronicle.

It doesn't get any better.

It's the Culture, Stupid

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Last month, law professors Amy Wax of U. Penn. and Larry Alexander of U. San Diego published this op-ed in the Philadelphia Inquirer.  Their thesis was that the breakdown of "the basic cultural precepts that reigned from the late 1940s to the mid-1960s" was "implicated" in a host of modern maladies, including crime:

Too few Americans are qualified for the jobs available. Male working-age labor-force participation is at Depression-era lows. Opioid abuse is widespread. Homicidal violence plagues inner cities. Almost half of all children are born out of wedlock, and even more are raised by single mothers. Many college students lack basic skills, and high school students rank below those from two dozen other countries.
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That [late 40s - mid 60s] culture laid out the script we all were supposed to follow: Get married before you have children and strive to stay married for their sake. Get the education you need for gainful employment, work hard, and avoid idleness. Go the extra mile for your employer or client. Be a patriot, ready to serve the country. Be neighborly, civic-minded, and charitable. Avoid coarse language in public. Be respectful of authority. Eschew substance abuse and crime.

This would seem to be self-evident and ought not be controversial.  But Wax and Alexander work in the Bizarro World of contemporary academia.
The battle over criminal justice "reform" can be seen as a struggle between two forces: Some, in the name of increased safety and the better lives and opportunities safety creates, prefer crime suppression as the touchstone of progress. Others see incarceration itself as the problem,  certainly at its present levels. They think that, in a country dedicated to freedom, less incarceration is in order even if it means a degree of increased crime.  (Those claiming we can significantly reduce incarceration without increasing crime simply are not serious.  Fifty years of nationwide data show this proposition is false).

Who has the better of the argument?  I'm in the first camp, for reasons I've elaborated in dozens of posts.

But the debate over criminal justice reform elides a crucial point.  How much crime and incarceration we get depends less on the laws we adopt  --  tough or easy  -- than on the culture we create.  In the 1950's, we had an admirable degree of safety (roughly comparable to what we have now) with a prison population vastly smaller.

This did not happen by magic.  It happened because of what is derisively called "bourgeois" culture.  Astonishingly, and with great courage, two professors, Amy Wax of Penn and Larry Alexander of San Diego, have described what we can achieve when we embrace standards and reject excuse-making.

Q: When Is It OK to Commit Murder?

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A:  When the murder victim is a white frat boy.

If you find that repulsive, good for you.  But that's the reaction of the poisonous, race-obsessed ideology behind much of the radicalized thinking on crime now in vogue in academia and the "entertainment" industry.

I take my cue here from the recent horrible death of 22 year-old Otto Warmbier, formerly a University of Virginia student, who was returned declining and comatose from his captivity in North Korea.  He died a few days ago.  As noted in this Commentary article, "Warmbier's death at the hands of a criminal regime is perhaps the most vicious crime directed against an American citizen by [North Korean] authorities since two U.S. officers were murdered by an axe-wielding mob...in 1976. This is an offense to American dignity and sovereignty--and it is proving a revealing moment in American politics. Warmbier's capture and his fate have exposed again the utter moral perversion of the social justice left."

The following are two examples of reactions to Warmbier's treatment*  normal people could not imagine would be given by anyone with decency.  But that's because normal people don't usually read what passes for intellectual refinement on the "social justice left."

[Ed. note:  I originally said "death," but our first commenter correctly notes that Warmbier, though in captivity, was still alive when the comments were made].


As my last post makes clear, I do not believe religion ought directly dictate secular criminal justice policy.  I am very much of the view, however, that it is the moral anchor of many people's view of wrongdoing, error, punishment and redemption.

One of the most insightful thinkers on these subjects is my friend Will Haun, a certain leader in the next generation of conservative legal analysts.  I want to bring you his keynote remarks at the Napa Institute Symposium on "Public Policy and our Catholic Faith," held last March.  It was sponsored in part by the Koch Foundation, an organization I often oppose on policy specifics but greatly admire for its consistent stand for freedom.

Will started out:

Thank you very much for inviting me to speak at this excellent symposium on such an important topic.  And thank you, Jenny, for such a kind introduction.  It reminds me of one of my favorite New Yorker cartoons.  Pictured in the cartoon is a towering statue of a well-dressed man boldly pointing toward the horizon.  Below the man is an inscription that says "Solider, Statesman, Author, Patriot," and then, in smaller font below, it, "But Still a Disappointment to His Mother." 

Just How Warped Is Legal Academia?

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I ask this question because, at random, I looked at the two most recent entries on Sentencing Law and Policy.  Here they are:


Kent recently noted the numerous and flagrant fabrications by an organization supporting a version of California "sentencing reform."  In the News Scan entry just before his, CJLF's staff discussed the legal settlement Rolling Stone magazine had been forced to cough up as a result of its wonderfully detailed fabrication of a rape at the University of Virginia. The made-up rapists were made-up white males.

That same day, I read a short introduction to a new book, "From Retribution to Public Safety: Disruptive Innovation of American Criminal Justice."  Its first paragraph asserts:

Over the past fifty years, American criminal justice policy has had a nearly singular focus -- the relentless pursuit of punishment.  Punishment is intuitive, proactive, logical, and simple. But the problem is that despite all of the appeal, logic, and common sense, punishment doesn't work.  The majority of crimes committed in the United States are by people who have been through the criminal justice system before, many on multiple occasions.

A better example of mendacity displacing argument would be hard to conceive.
Kent noted that an unrepentant terrorist will be honored in this year's NYC Puerto Rico Day parade (with Mayor de Blasio proudly marching in step).

Along those same lines, and also from the "you-can't-make-this-up" department, it now seems that Sydney plans to honor Black Lives Matter with a "peace" prize.


The Black Lives Matter movement will receive the Sydney Peace Prize, an award given by the Sydney Peace Foundation -- part of the University of Sydney -- and be honored at an event in the city in November, the foundation announced this week.

Black Lives Matter was chosen for allegedly "building a powerful movement for racial equality, courageously reigniting a global conversation around state violence and racism. And for harnessing the potential of new platforms and power of people to inspire a bold movement for change at a time when peace is threatened by growing inequality and injustice," the foundation's website states.

I registered my dissent.

Why Baltimore Is a Murder Vortex

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It's no longer disputed (if it ever was) that Baltimore has seen a staggering increase in murder at least since the politically-staged Freddie Gray prosecutions of six police officers.  This was the city where the then-Mayor, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, told us that rioters and arsonists should be given "space to destroy."  (Ms. Rawlings-Blake later went on to fame when she was chosen to open the Democratic National Convention).

One might wonder why, exactly, Baltimore has become a murder vortex to an even greater extent than in the past.  I can't say for sure.  One reason is likely to be the handicapping of the police, most vividly on display with the aforementioned Freddie Gray prosecutions, and more recently backed up by the consent decree engineered by Obama administration lawyers in order to benefit drug dealers insure civil rights.

A second, more deep-seated and in a way even more appalling reason is captured by the news story whose first line is:  "A Project Baltimore investigation has found five Baltimore City high schools and one middle school do not have a single student proficient in the state tested subjects of math and English."

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