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The Travel Ban Case and the Fallacy of Assuming the Conclusion

One thing that really makes my eyes roll is seeing someone state the question presented in a case in a way that assumes one side of a hotly disputed point and then phrases the "question" as something that no one would dispute based on that assumption.  It's bad enough when advocates do it.  It is inexcusable for a judge to do it.  For the majority of a U.S. Court of Appeals en banc to join an opinion doing that is a head-shaker.  The Fourth Circuit opinion in the travel ban case, International Refugee Assistance Project v. Trump, No. 17-1351, begins:

The question for this Court, distilled to its essential form, is whether the Constitution, as the Supreme Court declared in Ex parte Milligan, 71 U.S. (4 Wall.) 2, 120 (1866), remains "a law for rulers and people, equally in war and in peace." And if so, whether it protects Plaintiffs' right to challenge an Executive Order that in text speaks with vague words of national security, but in context drips with religious intolerance, animus, and discrimination.
I don't have time at present to write up a complete analysis of the opinion, but right out of the gate this seems to call for Supreme Court review.

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