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Mother shot dead at anti-crime vigil in Chihuahua

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Ken Ellingwood has this story with accompanying video in the LA Times:

Reporting from Mexico City --
Outraged when judges freed the main suspect in her daughter's killing, Marisela Escobedo Ortiz launched a one-woman protest across the street from government offices in northern Mexico.

Now she is dead too.

In a brazen killing caught on video, a gunman chased Escobedo and shot her at close range Thursday night in front of the governor's office building in the capital of Chihuahua state.

How bad it is in Mexico?

Amnesty International blamed "the negligence of state and federal authorities" for what it called reprisal attacks against activists and relatives of crime victims. "The deficiencies of the judicial system in cases of murdered women and girls have been demonstrated once again," the group said in a statement Friday.

That's right.   Amnesty International, the organization that works so hard to support murderers in the United States, is actually taking the side of the victims of crime for once.  Even a stopped clock is right twice a day.  It is unfortunate, though, that things have to get this bad before Amnesty wakes up to the reality that the murderers are the oppressors and the murdered are the oppressed.

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"Amnesty International blamed "the negligence of state and federal authorities" for what it called reprisal attacks against activists and relatives of crime victims".

Agreed. When it comes to fighting crime, Mexico is a dysfunctional state that doesn't do even remotely enough to fight lawlessness in its country.

"Even a stopped clock is right twice a day".

Amnesty International is an evil organization. Its support for abortion makes it virtually impossible for me to support it.

But in seeking to abolish the horrendous human rights abuses that the United States inflicts on its prisoners, Amnesty International is at least trying to move the clock forward, and not backward when it comes to protecting prisoners' most fundamental human rights.

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