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CDCR Considers Discharging 10,000 Missing Parolees: Mike Luery of KCRA News reports the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation is reviewing 9,209 arrest warrants for missing parolees in the state in consideration for discharge from parole. CJLF President Michael Rushford said this is a way for the state to eliminate accountability for thousands of repeat offenders and lower recidivism rates. Sacramento County Sheriff Scott Jones predicts releasing these missing felons will cause a rise in the state's crime rates. Sacramento County District Attorney Jan Scully does not think the missing felons should be discharged from parole because the state has not been doing its job. Parole revocation responsibility will move from the Board of Parole to local courts July 1, 2013.

13th TX Execution of Year Carried Out: The Associated Press reports Texas executed Mario Swain by lethal injection Thursday evening. Swain was convicted of the brutal murder of a woman in her own home during the commission of a burglary on December 27, 2002. The woman was stabbed, beaten with a tire iron, and strangled to death. Swain then put her body in the trunk of her car, drove about 120 miles, then dumped her in an abandoned vehicle. He had a notebook with the names of women he intended to follow, rob, and attack. According to Prosecutor Lance Larison, Swain was a "serial killer in training." Swain, Texas' 13th execution this year, was pronounced dead at 6:39 p.m.

OH Execution Set for Dismemberment, Stabbing Killer:
The Associated Press reports Brett Hartman is set for execution in Ohio Tuesday. Hartman was convicted of the murder of 46-year-old Winda Snipes in 1997.  She was found with over 100 stab wounds, her hands cut off and her throat slit.  On Thursday Ohio Governor John Kasich denied Hartman's request for clemency.

SCJC Given Grants to Study Realignment: Natasha Weaser of the Stanford Daily reports grants totaling $650,000 were awarded to the Stanford Criminal Justice Center to research impacts of California's Realignment. Contributors include the U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Public Welfare Foundation, and the James Irvine Foundation. The four research projects include a review of approaches to realignment by all 58 counties, case studies of  selected counties, and judicial and prosecutor discretion.  SCJC research findings will be shared with policymakers by late summer or fall of 2013.


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