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California Inmates Participating in Hunger Strike May Be Force-Fed: As a statewide prison hunger strike enters its seventh week, a federal judge has approved a request from California officials to force-feed inmates if necessary.  Don Thompson of the Associated Press reports that 130 of the original 30,000 hunger strikers are still refusing meals in 6 of the 33 state's prisons.  The ruling, which allows prison officials to feed inmates, who are deemed to be in failing health, goes against a previous prison policy that would allow inmates to starve to death if they had signed a do-not-resuscitate request.

Realignment Increases Workload for LAPD Officers: California's prison Realignment bill, aimed at reducing prison overcrowding, has forced dozens of Los Angeles police officers to leave their regular patrol duties in order to monitor newly paroled ex-cons.  Joel Ruben of the LA Times reports that, since the implementation of Realignment, the LAPD has had as many as 170 officers assigned to units responsible for monitoring felons after their release from state prison--a shift that has cost the city an additional $18 million in payroll.  The LAPD has arrested roughly 3,100 of the 5,400 ex-cons brought to the Los Angeles area through Realignment.

Detroit Looks Into Utilizing Stop-And-Frisk Policy: With violent crimes on the rise in Detroit, police are looking to implement a policy generating a lot of controversy in New York:  stop-and-frisk searches.  Maurielle Lue of Fox 2 reports that the policy allows for officers to stop and search citizens behaving in a suspicious manner without requiring probable cause.  Last week, a federal judge ruled that New York's stop-and-frisk policy was unconstitutional based on her belief that the stops were the result of racial profiling.

Oklahoma College Student Murdered for the "fun of it": A 22-year-old Australian exchange-student studying at an Oklahoma university on a baseball scholarship was gunned down by a group of three teenagers who allegedly shot the man because they were "bored" and "decided to kill somebody".  Fox News reports that the three boys in custody, ages 15, 16, and 17, will appear in court later today where they will most likely face first-degree murder charges.  The teens can be tried as adults, and if convicted, face a maximum sentence of life in prison.

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