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Habitual Criminal Leads Police on High Speed Chase: A Colorado man with a lengthy criminal record dating back to 2003 was arrested this morning after leading police on a high speed chase that resulted in a variety of charges including carjacking and kidnapping.  Erik Ortiz of NBC News reports that the incident began this morning when 28-year-old Ryan Stone, who was already wanted on two warrants, stole an SUV from a gas station with a 4-year-old boy inside, he eventually ditched the SUV and proceeded to carjack two additional vehicles before police were finally able to take him into custody.  A police officer attempting to lay stop spikes in the road was hit by Stone and remains in the hospital in serious condition.

Inmate Pleads Guilty to Murder to Avoid Possible Death Sentence: An inmate at a federal prison in California has plead guilty to murder for his role in the 2008 killing of a correctional officer, eliminating the possibility of a death sentence.  Scott Smith of the Associated Press reports that 48-year-old James Leon Guerrero was already serving a life sentence for bank robbery when authorities say held a corrections officer while another inmate stabbed him more than 20 times, resulting in the officer's death.  The other inmate, Jose Sablan, is scheduled to stand trial in April 2015, and if convicted, faces a possible death sentence.

OpEd Questions WA Gov's Death Penalty Announcement:  Washington Governor Jay Inslee's announcement last Tuesday that he was suspending the death penalty in order to "join a growing national conversation" has garnered praise from opponents of capital punishment.  There was no hint that he might do this in 2012, when Inslee was seeking election.  Washington Congressman and the former lead investigator in the Green River Killer case, Dave Reichert, has this OpEd piece in the Seattle Times raising questions about the wisdom of Inslee's decision. 

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